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THE TOLEDO 
MUSEUM OF ART 

Toledo, Ohio 

November 4-December 3, 1972 

MUSEUM OF 
CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS 

New York, New York 
January 11 -March 25, 1973 

MUSEUM OF ART 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTE 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
April 15-May 20, 1973 

CORNING MUSEUM 
OF GLASS 

Corning, New York 

June 17-September4, 1973 

RENWICK GALLERY 
NATIONAL COLLECTION 
OF FINE ARTS 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 
October 13-December 1, 1973 

SAN FRANCISCO 
MUSEUM OF ART 

San Francisco, California 
January 17-March 3, 1974 

SANTA BARBARA 
MUSEUM OF ART 

Santa Barbara, California 
March 24-May 5, 1974 



Exhibition dates are subject 
to possible change. 



AMERICAN 

GLAS 
NCW 



THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART 
MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY CRAFS 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

We wish to express our deepest 
appreciation to Corning Glass 
Company, Libbey-Owens-Ford 
Company, Owens-Corning Fiberglas 
Corporation and Owens-Illinois, 
Incorporated for their generous 
support in sponsoring this exhibition. 
Their interest and enthusiasm are 
responsible for making this exhibition 
possible. 

We are grateful to the artists for their 
cooperation in making their work 
available for the extended period of 
this exhibition. We are also deeply 
indebted to many of the participants 
for their suggestions and advice. 

To the other participating museums 
which have made it possible for 
AMERICAN GLASS NOW to be seen 
by a far larger audience, we would 
also like to express our appreciation. 

Finally, we would like to thank those 
staff members of our respective 
museums who assisted in each phase 
of the organization, preparation and 
presentation of the exhibition and 
catalogue. Special thanks should go to 
Charles F. Gunther, Assistant Director 
(Education) of the Toledo Museum for 
his assistance as a consultant. 

Otto Wittmann, Director 
The Toledo Museum of Art 

Paul Smith, Director 

The Museum of Contemporary Crafts 

of the American Crafts Council 



Library of Congress 
Catalogue Card No. 72-8895 1 
©The Toledo Museum of Art 



INTRODUCTION 



Brilliant, brittle, fragile, fluid in 
form, glass has been a rare 
commodity and highly prized 
throughout most of history. It is 
only within the last hundred 
years when it has been possible 
to make glass by machine that 
it has become a common and 
inexpensive substance. In antiq- 
uity it was more rare than 
gold, and as precious as the 
finest jewels. 

Glass is among the very few 
apparently solid substances 
which have no crystaline struc- 
ture, and has for this reason 
often been described as a 
"super-cooled liquid"— a sub- 
stance that has passed from 
a molten to a rigid state without 
structural change. 

Glass is unique among the 
materials available to artists in 
that it must be worked at a 
temperature too hot to handle. 
Unlike any other artist, the 
glassworker must keep his work 
at arm's length as he shapes 
the molten material. 

While glass has been made 
by man for almost 4000 years, 
the most revolutionary event in 
the history of glassworking 
was the introduction of the blow 
pipe which historians generally 
agree occurred shortly before 



the birth of Christ. The methods 
and ingredients used to make 
glass and the tools used to form 
it have changed little over the 
centuries, with the exception of 
the ingenious machines which 
brought about mass production 
in the 20th century. 

However, a dramatic change 
in the role of the individual 
glassworker has come about 
within the past ten years in the 
United States. In contrast to 
the earlier 20th century commer- 
cial method in both the United 
States and Europe where art 
glass was produced by crafts- 
men who formed shapes in 
three dimensions which had 
been designed on paper by an 
artist, a new concept has de- 
veloped in which the designer 
and craftsman are one and 
the same. 

The concept of a designer 
who is also a craftsman is not 
new. A general revival of inter- 
est in studio craftsmanship 
began in the United States in the 
1930's. While there has been 
great interest and development 
in the craft concept in ceramics, 
textiles and metal, there was 
no parallel interest in the craft 
of glassworking until the late 
1 950's. 



At the 1 959 conference of the 
American Crafts Council there 
was discussion of a new craft 
potential for glass. Harvey 
Littleton, then a ceramicist who 
attended that Conference, 
agreed to study the possibilities 
of studio glassblowing. While 
some experiments were made, 
and many discussions were held 
in Toledo and elsewhere con- 
cerning possible methods of 
studio glassworking, a workshop 
for the actual production of 
studio glass took place for the 
first time in Toledo in 1 962, only 
a decade ago. 
It happened because 
designer-craftsmen in the field 
of ceramics felt that the medium 
of glass also had great poten- 
tial for creative expressive 
forms. Only the technical ability 
to work the material was lack- 
ing. In March 1962, The Toledo 
Museum of Art invited Harvey 
Littleton, a former Museum 
instructor in ceramics who was 
at that time an instructor in 
ceramics at the University of 
Wisconsin, to conduct a seminar 
in glassworking. 

This first creative glass work- 
shop, held in a small garage on 
the Toledo Museum's grounds, 
had its moments of excitement, 
frustration and hilarity. A small 

4 



furnace was constructed by 
Littleton and eight students, 
most of whom were experienced 
potters interested in the possi- 
bility of using glass as a new 
medium. The furnace would not 
develop heat sufficient to melt 
the glass formula first devised. It 
was then that Dominick Labino, 
at that time research vice- 
president for Johns-Manville 
Fiber Glass Corporation, and 
an avocational student in several 
Museum art classes, was invited 
to solve the technical difficulties 
encountered. With the use of 
a new formula Labino provided 
the seminar with molten glass. 
However, attempts to blow forms 
from the molten material were 
only exploratory. Through the 
advice of Harvey Leafgreen, 
retired 69-year old Libbey Glass 
Company glassblower, the 
group learned almost forgotten 
methods. The achievement of 
that first seminar was slight 
indeed, but Littleton, Labino and 
the other participants in the ten- 
day seminar had assured them- 
selves that glass could be worked 
as a craft and were stimulated 
to continue their experiments. 

A second Toledo Museum 
seminar in June 1962, again 
under the direction of Littleton 
with twelve different students 



and a newly built furnace, ex- 
panded the knowledge and 
possibilities of glass craftsman- 
ship. Labino, who had provided 
the original formula for the first 
seminar, had been so stimulated 
by the possibilities that by June 
he had established his own 
private workshop on his farm in 
Grand Rapids, Ohio. He retired 
from his company in 1965, and 
today devotes much of his time to 
glassworking and scientific 
research. 

Littleton returned to the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin where he 
has continued to work and teach 
ever since. He not only set up 
his own glass workshop at home, 
but developed courses in glass- 
working at the University from 
which emerged many of the 
glass craftsmen who are today 
the leaders in their field. 

The Toledo Museum con- 
tinued to hold several additional 
seminars and then established 
the first Toledo Glass National 
biennial exhibition in 1966. 
Subsequently, with funds pro- 
vided by Toledo glass industries, 
a building was erected on the 
Museum grounds to house mod- 
ern equipment for teaching 
glass craftsmanship as a continu- 
ing course within the regular 



curriculum of the Museum's 
School of Design. 

This exhibition, AMERICAN 
GLASS NOW, celebrates the 
10th anniversary of the studio 
glassworking movement and is 
the outgrowth of the Toledo 
Museum's three biennial national 
exhibitions. Today, glasswork- 
ing is taught in more than 50 
universities, colleges and art 
schools across the country and 
is practised by artist-craftsmen 
in all parts of our country as 
well as in parts of Europe. The 
current exhibition shows the 
work not only of some of the 
founders of this movement, but 
also the innovative and ad- 
vanced work of a "second 
generation". 

In addition to the Toledo 
Museum's Glass National exhi- 
bitions of 1966, 1968 and 1970, 
which received nationwide cir- 
culation by the Smithsonian 
Institution to many other mu- 
seums, The Museum of Contem- 
porary Crafts also gave early 
recognition to some of the lead- 
ing glassworkers through one- 
man exhibitions of the work of 
Harvey Littleton in 1964, Joel 
Philip Myers in 1967, Marvin 
Lipofsky in 1969, Andre Billed 
in 1970 and Dale Chihuly in 



1 971 . The Corning Glass 
Museum, as well as museums in 
San Jose, Dallas, Pittsburgh, 
Tacoma and Long Beach, among 
others, have organized their 
own exhibitions of studio glass- 
working during this period. 

During the past decade many 
of the early technical problems 
of the studio glassworkers in the 
United States have been solved 
and the artist today is free to 
explore the myriad possibilities 
of the medium. Each artist is 
responsible for the quality of the 
molten glass he uses and the 
design and execution of the ob- 
jects he forms. The studio glass- 
worker is now an artist in the 
fullest sense of the word, 
creating forms fully aware of 
the unique possibilities of 
his medium. 

There is a healthy diversity in 
the glass produced today and 
shown in this exhibition. The 
metamorphosis of glassworking 
from a craft to an art has oc- 
curred. It is hoped that through 
this exhibition an increasing 
awareness of the creative 
potential of glass will become 
evident and that glassworkers 
will continue to develop the 
possibilities of this fascinating 
but difficult medium. The artists 

6 



working in glass today are 
searching for new forms, com- 
bining glass with other mate- 
rials, and developing new 
techniques independent of in- 
dustrial technology. They are 
exploring new horizons as 
part of the mainstream of 
contemporary art. 

Otto Wittmann, Director 
The Toledo Museum of Art 



STATEMENT 



AMERICAN GLASS NOW is an 
invitational exhibition. The 33 
glassworkers represented in the 
exhibition were invited to partici- 
pate after extensive research was 
conducted and slides of the work 
of over 60 people were viewed. 
The intent of the exhibition is to 
show the wide range of activity 
now taking place in the United 
States by artist-craftsmen who 
specialize in work in the glass 
medium. It is obviously impossible 
for such an exhibition to represent 
everyone active in glassworking 
today. Specifically not included 
is the whole area of architectural 
glass and sculpture made in 
factories from the artist's plans 
and specifications. 

Perhaps the most unifying char- 
acteristic of the objects in 
AMERICAN GLASS NOW is the 
sensitively controlled use of 
molten or semi-molten glass. The 
unique challenge of glass comes 
from the immediacy with which it 
must be manipulated into a com- 
pleted form. No other material 
can duplicate the optical richness 
of glass; its qualities include 
endless possibilities of color, 
reflection, translucency, and 
transparency. 

The work in glass today repre- 
sents a departure from the free 
blown organic forms of the be- 



ginning experiments made during 
the early sixties. AMERICAN 
GLASS NOW shows an impres- 
sive development of an expanded 
range of techniques. Not only 
have contemporary craftsmen 
further refined traditional disci- 
plined off-hand glass blowing 
techniques, but they have also 
utilized other forming methods 
such as casting molten glass or 
sagging and bending sheets and 
blocks of semi-molten glass. In 
addition to fuming, a technique 
using chemicals to imparta 
changing iridescence to the sur- 
face color, a number of other 
surface treatments are employed. 
They range from sandblasting 
and engraving which cut into the 
surface, to electroplating and 
painting which coat it. 

AMERICAN GLASS NOW reflects 
an increasing interest in com- 
bining glass with other materials. 
In addition to the obvious need 
to place smaller-scaled glass 
objects on a pedestal or in a case 
for convenient viewing, the artist 
occasionally mounts a form on a 
base of metal or other material 
to emphasize his sculptural intent. 
In most instances, however, 
wood, metal, or plastics have 
become component parts of the 
object. Although most of the glass 
in the exhibition relies upon light 



from an outside source, a number 
of artists have incorporated light 
as an integral part of their work. 
The exhibition also reflects an 
impressive range in scale, from 
very large sculpture to minute 
work which can only be seen in 
detail with a magnifying glass. 

Contemporary glass craftsmen 
have concentrated on two main 
directions of expression: con- 
tainer forms and personal sculp- 
tural statements. Many of the 
artists fluctuate between the two 
directions, while others concen- 
trate in one area. In reviewing 
the material, equal concern was 
given to the selection of both 
utilitarian or decorative objects, 
and sculpture. The final selection 
represents strength in both fields. 

For a long time, Europe had been 
the center of creative glass- 
working, but during the past ten 
years we have seen a vast devel- 
opment in the United States. 
Through World Craft Council 
meetings and other exchange 
programs, an active international 
movement has developed. Sev- 
eral of the artists represented in 
AMERICAN GLASS NOW have 
spent time studying techniques in 
European studios and factories. 
American glassworkers have also 
taught seminars and assisted in 
establishing glass workshops in 



several countries. A few have 
designed objects produced 
under the artist's supervision in 
European glass companies. And 
European designers have been 
influenced by the freedom of 
design in American glass. During 
the summer of 1 972 several 
American glassworkers partici- 
pated in an exhibition and glass 
symposium held at the Bellerive 
Museum in Zurich, Switzerland. 
At that time an international or- 
ganization was established to 
expand the communication 
already begun among glass- 
workers from all parts of the 
world. 

In observing the exhibition we 
can acclaim the vast growth of 
creative glassworking in the U.S. 
during the last ten years, but this 
collection hopefully represents 
only a beginning of what is to 
come. 



Robert F. Phillips, Curator, Contemporary Art 
The Toledo Museum of Art 

Paul Smith, Director 

The Museum of Contemporary Crafts 




Eric G. Hilton 
Cloud Island 
24" x 19%" x 19%' 




Richard Thomas 
McGlauchlin 
Vase 
7'/2"x8"x8" 



Richard Thomas 

McGlauchlin 

Vase 

9'h" x6V*"x6W 




1] 






James L. Tanner 

Airships 

4 3 /8"x3'/4"x3%", 

3 5 / 8 "x3'/4"x3 , /4", 

}0V<" xWx6V/' 

7 5 /e"x 11%"x7 3 /4" 

4 3 /4"x3 5 /8"x3y 8 " 



James L. Tanner 
Mirror, Mirror, 
Bowl and Ball 
5"x 12y 8 "xl2y 8 ' 





Joel Philip Myers 
Hand Form 
9 5 / 8 "x5"x3 3 /4" 



Joel Philip Myers 
Hand Form 
10"x5"x3'/2" 



Joel Philip Myers 
Hand Form 
9%"x5%"x4" 



13 




Jack A. Schmidt 
Game Ball 
5 5 /s"x 15"x5 3 //' 




Jack A. Schmidt 
Lottery Game #129 
6'/ 8 "x20"x 14" 



15 




16 




Eriks P. Rudans 
Clusterform II 
ir/2"x31"x24" 



17 




Marvin B. Lipofsky 
Glass Sculpture LT6 
10" x 15" x 13" 



Marvin B. Lipofsky 
Glass Sculpture 1 
ir/ 2 "x 15" x 17" 

18 




19 




Kimrie T. Newcomb 
Vase 

6'/2"x4%"x4ft" 
Footed Bowl 
7V2"x5Vi"x5Vt" 



Fritz Dreisbach 
Fritzensteins 

6 5 / 8 "x6'/ ; ."x 
3%", 

6"x5'/2"x3'//' ; 
5 3 //' x6Ve "x3Vi' 
5 3 / 8 " x 5Vi" x 3 3 /s' 



Fritz Dreisbach 

Tenth Anniversary Cup 





Harvey Littleton 
Striped Blue Loops 
6 3 /4"x8%"x2", 

6 I / ! "x8'/2"x2'/ ! " 
5%"x4"x l 3 /4" 

22 




Harvey Littleton 
Pile Up 
19'/4"x38 3 /4"x4" 



23 





Thomas W. Kekic 
Chicken Bug House 
H 3 /4"x5 , /2"x3 3 /4" 



Thomas W. Kekic 
White Bug House 
12%"x5 3 / 8 "x3 3 /4" 



24 






/ 







Masked Bandit 
4%"x 14%"xll%' 



25 







¥ 





Kent F. Ipsen 
Glass Bottle 
12'/2"x7'/ 2 "x3" 



26 






Kent F. Ipsen 
Glass Jar 
14" x 10" 



27 



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>S 4 



V s 



- 



William Bernstein 
Convention Piece 
7" x 25" x 6" 





William Bernstein 
Stoppered Jar with Bowl 
Bear, Bird and Bike 
14'//'x9"x6 3 /4" 



28 




John Conrad Lewis 
Moon Bottle #1 
4 1 /4"x3 , /2"x3 1 / 2 " 



29 




Michael Whitley 
Self Portrait with 
Double Lightning Bolts 
44"x42 , /4"x45 , / 2 " 

30 



Jan Zandhuis 
84" x 9" x 9", 
90" x 9" x 9", 
96" x 9" x 9" 




31 



John David Lander 
Glass Landscape #1 
42 , /2"x28"xll 3 / 8 " 

32 








David Hopper 
13%" x 18 3 /s" x 10%' 



David Hopper 

#6 

20'/4"x 12 3 /4"x 14%' 







33 




Dominick Labino 
Emergence, XII 
9"x5y 8 "x3 3 /8" 



34 




Dominick Labino 

Conflagration 

8Vb"x6"x6" 



35 



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Daniel Owen Dailey 
Dog Table 
19 3 /4"x34'/4"x 11%" 

36 




Daniel Owen Dailey 
Pair of Rockership Lamps 
12" x Wk"xTh", 
10 5 / 8 "x 14V4"x6%" 



37 




Jamie Carpenter and 

Dale Chihuly 

Dry Ice, Bent Glass and 

Neon 

30" x 180" x 78" 



38 






Jamie Carpenter and 
Dale Chihuly 
Leaded Glass Door 
84" x 42" x 4" 




39 




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Richard Marquis 
Lightning Rod 
Scatter Piece 

%"x6 3 A"xl ! /i" 
approximately 



**», 



****** « 4 **--»*'* 




Richard Marquis 

The Lord's Prayer 

Murrini 

V/' x 3" x '//', 

'/2"xl 7 /8"xl%" 



40 




41 



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Mark Peiser 
Fishbowl #2 
10 3 /4"x 10%" 



lOVs' 




Mark Peiser 

Landscape 

10'/ 8 "x 10%" x lOYs" 

42 






43 



% 





Curtis C. Hoard 
Interlocking 
7"x32"x 13" 



David C. Hoard 

Transfusion 

12"xl6 , / 2 "x24 , /4' 



44 




James M. Wayne 
Folded Wienie 
14 3 A"x7V4"x4Vs" 



James M. Wayne 
Folded Wienie 
13 3 A"x7 3 A"x5V<" 




45 




Audrey Handler 

Waffle 

13"x8 3 /4"x8 3 /4" 

46 




Audrey Handler 

Breakfast 

18%" X 19 7 /e" X 13%' 



47 




Michael Edward Cohn 

Untitled 

3%"x 10 7 / 8 "x5'/ 2 " 

48 



Michael Edward Cohn 
Periscopic Descent 
61 , /2"x35'/2"x28 , /4" 




49 







Paula Bartron 
Untitled #13 
2 , /2"x5 1 /e"x2 7 /8' 

50 



Paula Bartron 
Untitled #3 
5 5 / 8 "x5'/4"x2 7 /8' 



Paula Bartron 
Untitled #8 
2 3 /s" x 4Vi" x 3% 



Robert Naess 
Political Cup 
4 , /b"x5 , /4"x2 7 / i 




Robert Naess 
Political Box 
4'/2"x5 5 / 8 "x2 3 /4" 



Robert Naess 
Black Lily 

Commemorative Cup 
4'/-" x5 5 / 8 " xTh" 






51 




Andre G. Billed 
Light Loops 
72" x 32" x 32" 

52 



CATALOGUE 



The dimensions given, unless otherwise noted, are 
listed in order of height, width, depth. 



Paula Bartron 



1. Untitled #2 

Blown cup with trailed decoration and 
applied disc handles, legs and foot. 
5%"x4%"x3 , / 8 " 

2. Untitled #3 

Blown cup with trailed decoration and 
applied open handles, legs, and foot. 
5%"x5Vi"x2%" 

3. Untitled #8 

Blown cup with applied foot and handle. 
2 3 /«"x4'/2"x3 7 /«" 

4. Untitled #9 

Blown cup with applied foot and handle. 
2 7 / 8 "x6 3 /8"x4" 

5. Untitled #13 

Blown cup with applied foot; blown, applied 
handle and fumed surface. 
2'/2"x5 , /e"x2 7 / ! " 



William Bernstein 



6. Room Temperature Bear Dome 

Hot tooled base with applied handle,- off- 
hand blown dome with applied handles and 
hot tooled bear finial; off-hand blown dome 
with hot tooled finial covering bear finial. 
13 3 / 8 "x7"x6 7 / 8 " 

7. Motorcycle Decanter 

Off-hand blown decanter with applied 
handles,- off-hand blown stopper with hot 
tooled motorcycle finial. 
14 5 / 8 "x5 5 / 8 "x4 3 /4" 

8. Convention Piece 

Four hot tooled, coupled forms. 
7" x 25" x 6" 

9. Stoppered Jar with Bowl, Bear, Bird 
and Bike 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled jar with bowl 
stopper and hot tooled motorcycle finial 
and suspended hot tooled bird. 
14y2"x9"x6 3 /4" 



Andre G. Billed 



10. Four Plus One 

Five glass forms on wooden base with 
formica top with enclosed lighting. 
30" x 46" x 46" 



1 1. Light Loops 

Four glass forms on wooden base with 
formica top, plate glass support and enclosed 
lighting. 72" x 32" x 32" 



Jamie Carpenter & Dale Chihuly 

12. Leaded Glass Door 

Four off-hand blown rondels, plate glass and 
beveled plate glass with lead caning set in a 
wooden, hinged door frame and jamb. 
84" x 42" x 4" 
Lead caning by Mike Kennedy. 

1 3. Dry Ice, Bent Glass and Neon 

Bent plate glass form with plate glass sheets, 
neon rods and cubes of dry ice. 
30" x 1 80" x 78" 



Michael Edward Cohn 

14. Untitled 

Blown, cut and polished glass form with 
mirrors. 3 7 /s" x 10%" x 5 1 //' 

15. Periscopic Descent 

Lacquered wood base with plate glass and 
mirror supporting a dome of mold-blown, cut, 
ground and sandblasted glass with laminated 
and ground plate glass with a leaded edge. 
Periscope contained inside base. 
61 14" x 35 y 2 " x 28 y/' 



Daniel Owen Dailey 

16. Dog Table 

Six off-hand blown forms attached to sheet 
of plate glass with sandblasted decoration. 
19 3 /4"x34'/4"x ll 3 /4" 

17. Pair of Rocketship Lamps 

Off-hand blown forms with hot tooling and 
applied decoration, joined by gold plated 
brass fitting, with incandescent light bulbs. 
1 2" x 1 6V2" x 7/2", 1 0%" x 1 4'/4" x 6Vs" 



Fritz Dreisbach 

18. Fritzensteins 

Four steins of blown glass with impressed 
pattern and applied and pressed decoration. 
6 5 / 8 " x 6V2" x 3%", 6" x SV2" x 3y 2 ", 
5 3 /4" x 6Va" x 3'/2", 5%" x 5y 2 " x 3%" 

19. Tenth Anniversary Cup 

Off-hand blown glass with impressed pattern 
and applied and pressed decoration. 
Engraved surface. 



53 



Boris Dudchenko 



20. 

Off-hand blown glass form attached to a 

chrome pipe and base. 28" x 1 2" x 1 2" 

21. 

Two off-hand blown glass forms attached to 

chrome pipes on aluminum framed plastic 

base. 94" x 26" x 14" 

22. 

Three off-hand blown silvered glass 

forms attached to chrome pipes on aluminum 

framed plastic base. 94" x 23%" x 26'//' 



Henry Halem 



23. Tall Vase 

Off-hand blown, fumed vase with applied 
decoration. 10" x 3%" x 4V2" 

24. Milk Glass Vase 

Off-hand blown vase with applied 
decoration. 6%" x 5'A" x 5%" 

25. Masked Bandit 

Cast glass form. 414" x 1 4%" x 1 1 %" 



Audrey Handler 



26. Melted Sundae 

Polyurethane foam forms, off-hand blown 
glass containers with applied and hot tooled 
decoration on a wooden base with ground 
plate glass top and enclosed light. 
19%" x ]2V*" x9V»" 

27. Breakfast 

Polyurethane foam forms, pressed glass form, 
and off-hand blown glass forms with hot 
tooled and applied decoration on a wooden 
base with mirror top. 
18'/ 2 " x 19%" x 13%" 

28. Waffle 

Antique cast iron waffle iron with pressed 
glass waffle on a wooden base with ground 
glass top and enclosed light. 
13"x8 3 /4"x8 3 /4" 

29. Pair of Red Boots 

Off-hand blown glass forms with hot tooled, 
fumed and applied decoration. 
7 , / 8 "x5 7 /e"x3%" 



Eric G. Hilton 



Mixed media construction: cast and plate 
glass, wood, formica, vacuum formed plastic, 
plexiglas, enclosed lighting and motor. 
24" x 19'/4"x 1 9%" 

31. Polar Route 

Mixed media construction: cast glass and 
mirrors, wood, formica, plexiglas and 
enclosed lighting. 1 7 % " x 17%" xl7%" 

32. Three Sandblasted Planes 

Mixed media construction: three sand-blasted 
plate glass slabs on wooden and formica 
base with enclosed lighting. 
39"x30 , /4"x30 , /4" 

33. Wiggle with Five 

Five forms of fused and sagged sheets on 
wooden and formica base. 30" x 24" x 36" 

34. One Off 

Sixteen forms of fused sheets on wooden and 
formica base. 15%" x 24" x 24" 



Curtis C. Hoard 

35. Rubber Ducky 

Two off-hand blown glass forms with rubber, 
wire, chrome and flocked parts. 
4%" x 43%" x 23%" 

36. Interlocking 

Off-hand blown form with flocked metal 
section. 7" x 32" x 13" 

37. Transfusion 

Off-hand blown form with flocked metal, 
rubber, plexiglas and flocked parts. 
12"xl6 1 /2"x24 , /4" 



David Hopper 



30. Cloud Island 

54 



38. #6 

Two off-hand blown, hot tooled glass figures, 
each composed of two parts joined with 
epoxy. 20%" x 12%" x 14%" 

39. #7 

Figure composed of five off-hand blown, 
hot tooled forms joined with epoxy. 
21 "x 10%" x 15%" 

40. #11 

Figure composed of three off-hand blown, 
hot tooled forms joined with epoxy. 
13%" x 18%" x 10%" 

41. #10 

Figure composed of two off-hand blown, 
hot tooled forms joined with epoxy. 
12"x 12%"x8%" 



Kent F. Ipsen 



42. Glass Plate 

Off-hand blown plate with polychromed 
surface. 13%" x 19" x 18'/." 

43. Glass Jar 

Off-hand blown jar with trailed pattern. 
14" x 10" x 10" 

44. Glass Bottle 

Mold blown bottle with polychromed surface. 
12'/j"x7 1 /2"x3" 

45. Glass Form II 

Two off-hand blown glass forms with 
stainless steel and aluminum base. 
29 3 //'x 12y 8 "x8'/4" 



Thomas W. Kekic 



46. Blue Bug House 

Two off-hand blown parts joined into one 
form and applied decoration. 10" x 7" x 6" 

47. Chicken Bug House 

Two off-hand blown parts joined into one 
form and applied decoration. 
H 3 /4"x5 , /2"x3 3 /4" 

48. White Bug House 

Two off-hand blown parts joined into one 
form and applied decoration. 
12 3 / 8 "x5 3 / 8 "x3%" 



Dorninick Labino 



49. Conflagration 

Off-hand blown vase with applied design, 
cased. 8V»" x 6" x 6" 

50. Spatial Movement in Polychrome 
Four hot tooled forms. 

8'/2" x 8 3 /s" x 3%", 7%" x Th" x 2%", 
77b" x 67s" x 2%", 8" x 8 3 /4" x 3" 

51. Emergence, XII 

Hot tooled form enclosing air bubble and 
veil forms. 9" x SV&" x 3%" 

52. Luminescence 

Off-hand blown vase with applied 
festooning, cased. 8%" x AV*" x 4% " 

53. Pollution 

Cast panel with inlaid molten form on a 
wooden base. 48" x 18" x %" 

John David Lander 

54. Glass Landscape in Three Parts 

Six forms of sheet, slumped sheet and blown 
glass. 7" x 18" x 36" 



55. Glass Landscape #2 

Painted wooden base, sheet glass, slumped 
sheet glass with sandblasting and textured 
trailing. 39%" x 20 5 /s" x 17", includes base. 

56. Glass Landscape #1 

Painted wooden base, sheet glass, slumped 
sheet glass, off-hand blown, hot tooled 
glass with sandblasting and flocking. 
42'/ 2 " x 28" x 1 1 %", includes base. 



John Conrad Lewis 

57. Moon Bottle #1 

Off-hand blown sphere with luster patterning. 
4'/4"x3 , /2"x3'/ 2 " 

58. Moon Bottle #2 
Off-hand blown glass sphere. 
4 , //'x3 5 />"x3 i /»" 

59. Moon Bottle #3 

Off-hand blown sphere with luster patterning. 
4 3 /4" x 4" x 4" 

60. Moon Bottle #4 
Off-hand blown glass sphere. 
5 , //'x4 I /4"x4 3 /4" 

61. Moon Bottle #5 
Off-hand bllown glass sphere. 

Off-hand blown sphere with luster patterning. 
5 3 / 8 "x4 5 / 8 "x4%" 



iarvin B. i ipofsl 



62. Glass Sculpture LT1 

Two off-hand blown interlocking forms with 

cut and polished apertures. 

9"x 12 3 /4"xir/ 2 " 

Courtesy of Leerdam Glass Works Center, 

Leerdam, Holland 

63. Glass Sculpture LT6 

Two off-hand blown interlocking forms with 

cut and polished apertures. 

10"xl5"x 13" 

Courtesy of Leerdam Glass Works Center, 

Leerdam, Holland 

64. Glass Sculpture LT3 

Two off-hand blown interlocking forms with 

cut and polished apertures. 

8 3 /4"x 16%" x 1 1%" 

Courtesy of Leerdam Glass Works Center, 

Leerdam, Holland 

65. Glass Sculpture 1 
Off-hand blown, hot tooled form. 
ll'/ 2 "x 1 5" x 1 7" 

Courtesy of Venini Company, Venice, Italy 



66. Glass Sculpture 7 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled form. 

9 3 / 4 "x 11%" x ll 3 /4" 

Courtesy of Venini Company, Venice, Italy 

Harvey Littleton 

67. Distortion Box II 

Bent plate glass and metal rod. 
17'/ 2 "x 15"x24'/ 2 " 

68. Striped Blue Loops 

Three bent rods. 6 3 /4" x 8%" x 2", 
6%" x 8'/ 2 " x 2%", 5%" x 4" x 1 3 /4" 

69. Pile Up 

Cut and slumped sheets joined to cut rods 
with epoxy. 19%" x 38%" x 38%" x 4" 

70. Black and White Web 

Bent rods joined to metal support with epoxy. 
17%"x20'/ 2 "x4" 



Richard Marquis 



71 . Commemorative Cup 

Cup of fused glass rods with applied foot 
and handles. 3%" x 5'/s" x 4%" 

72. Heart Cup 

Fused mosaic cup with applied foot and 
handle. 4" x 6%" x 4 'A" 

73. Canne Cup 

Cup of fused glass rods, base and handle of 
applied rods. 2V2" x 5'/8" x 3 3 /s" 

74. Lightning Rod Scatter Piece 
80 cased and bent rods. 

Vb" x 6%" x 1 Vi" approximately. 

75. American Flag Murrini 

Cane with fused image of American flag in 
cross section. V*" x 3" x 'A", V 2 " x 1 7 / 8 " x %" 
Created in collaboration with Bob Naess, 
Fred Lucero, and Captain Dave. 

76. The Lord's Prayer Murrini 

Cane with fused text of Lord's Prayer in 
cross section. ] A" x 3" x 'A" , '/ 2 " x 1 %" x 1 5 /s" 
Created in collaboration with Bob Naess, 
Fred Lucero, Captain Dave, Brianman and 
Rafzello Del Bourgo. 

Richard Thomas McGlauchlin 

77. Vase 

Off-hand blown vase with trailed and fumed 
surface. 9'/2"x6%"x6 , /4" 

78. Vase 

Off-hand blown vase with trailings, cased. 
7'/>"x8"x8" 



55 



79. Vase with Four Steam Bubbles 

Off-hand blown vase with four steam bubbles 
blown in body. 6%" x 5" x 5" 

80. Vase with Four Steam Bubbles 

Off-hand blown vase with four steam bubbles 
in body, cased. 6%" x 4%" x 4%" 



Joel Philip Myers 



81. Hand Form 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled hand form with 
applied base and thumb and trailed pattern. 
9%"x5"x3 3 /4" 

82. Hand Form 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled hand form with 
applied base and thumb and trailed pattern. 
10"x5"x3'/ 2 " 

83. Hand Form 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled hand form with 
applied base and thumb and trailed pattern. 
9'/ 8 "x5%"x4" 

84. Up for Grabs 

Two forms of two off-hand blown, hot tooled 
hands each joined by epoxy with gold and 
decaled surfaces. 6" x 13" x 8'//' 



Robert Naess 



85. Black Lily Commemorative Cup 

Cup with fused mosaic inlays with applied 
molded foot and handle. 414 " x 5%" x 2Vi" 
Done in collaboration with Richard Marquis. 

86. Political Cup 

Fused mosaic cup with applied fused mosaic 
and molded foot and applied fused rod 
handle. 4 VI" x S'A" x Tk" 
Done in collaboration with Richard Marquis. 

87. Political Box 

Form of cut sheets, bent fused mosaic sheet, 
inlaid fused mosaic sheet, applied, molded 
and fused forms joined by copper wire. 
4V2" x5%" *2 3 A" 

88. Pie in the Sky 

Three separate pyramids, two with sixteen 
parts, one with twenty-seven parts. 
20"x60"x 18" 

89. Home 

Sheet glass house form. 
25" x 28" x 1 6" 



Kimrie T. Newcomb 



Off-hand blown vase with applied decoration 
and fumed surface. 1 1 " x 3%" x3%" 

91 . Footed Bowl 

Off-hand blown bowl with applied foot and 
fumed surface. 7Vi" x 5%" x 5Vs" 

92. Vase 

Off-hand blown vase with applied decoration 
and fumed surface. 6%" x 4Vi" x 4%" 



Mark Peiser 

93. Landscape 

Off-hand blown vase with hot tooled 
decoration, cased. 1 Vs " x 10Vi" x 

10%" 

94. Fishbowl#2 

Off-hand blown vase with hot tooled 
decoration, cased. 10%" x 1 3 /s " x 10%' 

95. Purple Flower Pot 

Off-hand blown vase with hot tooled 
decoration, cased. 14%" x 8%" x 8%" 



Eriks P. Rudans 



96. Rodline Clusterform 

Cluster of off-hand blown forms with gold 
and platinum luster on support of formica 
laminate with lacquer. 12" x 33" x 1 2 Vi " 

97. Clusterform II 

Cluster of off-hand blown forms on base of 
epoxy painted fiberglas reinforced polyester. 
Il%"x31"x24" 

98. Moressence 

Cluster of off-hand blown epoxy painted 
forms on support of painted fiberglas 
reinforced polyester. 30 Vi" x 21 Vi" x 1 1 %" 



Jack A. Schmidt 



90. Squeeze Bottle 

56 



99. Lottery Game #129 

Off-hand blown silvered and cased joined 
forms on mirror patterned sheet. 
6Vs"x20"x 14" 

100. Game Ball 

Off-hand blown, silvered, cased sphere. 
7Vt" x Tk" x Tk" 

101. Game Ball 

Off-hand blown sphere on two part mirror 
patterned sheet. 5%" x 15" x 5%" 

102. Lottery Game #129 

Off-hand blown silvered joined forms on 
mirror patterned sheet. 6%" x 12Vi" x 22'/?" 



103. Lottery Game #129 

Off-hand blown joined forms on mirror 
patterned sheet. 6%" x 12Vi" x 15%" 



James L. Tanner 

104. Mirror, Mirror, Bowl and Ball 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled, fumed bowl with 
off-hand blown fumed sphere. 
5"xl2%"x 12Vi" 

105. Cinderella 

Off-hand blown, fumed jar with applied 
handles containing off-hand blown, hot 
tooled and fumed spheres and an off-hand 
blown, trailed, hot tooled and fumed sphere 
stopper. 7%" x 6%" x 6" 

106. Airships 

Five off-hand blown forms, two with applied 
hot tooled decoration. 4%" x 3/4" x 3Vi", 
3%" x 3Y." x 3Va", lOVi" x 4 3 /4" x 6V*", 
7%" x 11 Vi" x 7 3 A", 4 3 A" x 3%" x3%" 



James M. Wayne 



107. Folded Wienie 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled, fumed, joined 
forms with applied foot. 
13%"x7 3 /4"x5'/4" 

108. Folded Wienie 

Off-hand blown, hot tooled forms with 
applied foot. 14%" x 7 ] A" x 4Vs" 



Michael Whitley 



109. Self Portraitwith Double Lightning Bolts 

Welded aluminum, sheet plastic, astroturf, 
construction with off-hand blown, hot tooled 
cased head. 44" x 42 'A" x 45% " 

110. ZAP 

Welded aluminum and sheet plastic 
construction with off-hand blown, hot tooled 
head.57"x20"x6%" 



Jan Zandhuis 



ill. 

Three groups of three off-hand blown glass 
tubes joined to three bases. One group 
silvered, the other two containing neon gas 
with attached electrodes. 
84" x 9" x 9", 90" x 9" x 9", 96" x 9" x 9" 



ARTISTS 



Paula Bartron 



Born: 

San Mateo, California 1946 

Education: 

College of San Mateo, San Mateo, 

California 
University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
One-Man Exhibitions 
Anneberg Gallery, San Francisco, 

California 
University of California at Davis College 

of San Mateo 



Residence- 
Berkeley, California 



William Bernstein 



Born: 

Newark, New Jersey 1945 
Education: 

Philadelphia College of Art, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 

North Carolina 

Residence: 

Burnsville, North Carolina 



Andre G. Billed 



Born: 

New York, New York 1933 

Education: 

State University of New York College of 

Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, 

New York 
Teaching: 
State University of New York College of 

Ceramics, Alfred, New York 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New 

York, New York 
Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, 

New York 1 970, 1 972 
The Bergstrom Art Center, Neenah, 

Wisconsin 
Collections: 
The Bergstrom Art Center, Neenah, 

Wisconsin 



Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, 

New York 
The Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
National Gallery of Prague, Prague, 

Czechoslovakia 
OBJECTS: USA-The.Johnson Wax Co. 

Residence: 

Alfred Station, New York 



Jamie Carpenter 



Born: 

Washington, D. C. 1949 

Education: 

Austria 

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 

Rhode Island 
Teaching: 
Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 

North Carolina 
California College of Arts & Crafts, 

Oakland, California 
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, 

Deer Isle, Maine 
Designer-Fabrica VENINI Murano-Venezia 
Pilchuck Summer Workshop, Stanwood, 

Washington 
Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 

Residence: 

North Pomfret, Vermont 



Dale Chihuly 



Born: 

Tacoma, Washington 1941 

Education: 

University of Washington, Seattle, 

Washington 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 

Rhode Island 
Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant 
Fulbright Scholarship Grant 
Teaching: 
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, 

Deer Isle, Maine 
Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 

North Carolina 



57 



University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
Pilchuck Summer Workshop, Stanwood, 

Washington 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 

Rhode Island 

Residence: 

Providence, Rhode Island 



Michael Edward Cohn 

Born: 

Long Beach, California 1949 

Education: 

Long Beach City College, Long Beach, 

California 
University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
Collections: 
City of San Francisco 

Residence: 

Berkeley, California 



Daniel Owen Dailey 

Born: 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1947 

Education: 

Philadelphia College of Art, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 

Rhode Island 
Fulbright Grant — Italy 
Teaching: 

Philadelphia Public Schools 
Lansdowne Friends School, Lansdowne, 

Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island School of Design (fellowship) 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Steel Gallery, Bridgehampton, Long Island, 

New York 
Philadelphia Art Alliance, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
Collections: 
A.C.E. Modern Art Collection 

58 



Residence: 

Providence, Rhode Island 



Fritz Dreisbach 



Born: 

Cleveland, Ohio 1941 

Education: 

Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio 

University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Teaching: 

Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 

Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 

North Carolina 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield 

Hills, Michigan 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
Western Kentucky University, Bowling 

Green, Kentucky 
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 
Collections: 

OBJECTS.- USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
University of Illinois, Normal, Illinois 
Western Carolina University, Cullowee, 

North Carolina 
Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North 

Carolina 
Krannert Museum of Art, Champaign, 

Illinois 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 

Residence: 

Penland, North Carolina 



Boris Dudchenko 



Born: 

Ukraine- 1943 
Education: 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Kutztown State College, Kutztown, 

Pennsylvania 
Teaching: 
Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 



One-Man Exhibitions: 

Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas 

Craft Alliance Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri 

L'Atelier Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 

Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas 

Residence: 

Greensburg, Pennsylvania 



Henry Halem 



Born: 

New York, New York 1938 
Education: 

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 

Rhode Island 
George Washington University, 

Washington, D. C. 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Teaching: 
Mary Washington College of the University 

of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Virginia 
Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, 

Virginia 
Akron Art Institute, Akron, Ohio 
Lee Nordness Gallery, New York, New York 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 
Collections: 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 
Cleveland Museum of Fine Arts, Cleveland, 

Ohio 



Residence: 

Kent, Ohio 



Audrey Handler 



Born: 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1934 

Education: 

Temple University, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
Boston University School of Fine and 

Applied Arts, Boston, Massachusetts 
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 
University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois 



University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Teaching: 

Cambridge School, Weston, Massachusetts 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 

North Carolina 
Hunterdon Art Center, Clinton, New Jersey 
Collections: 
Royal College of Art, London, England 

Residence: 

Madison, Wisconsin 

Eric G. Hilton 

Born: 

England 1937 
Education: 

Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, 

Scotland 
Moray House Teachers Training College, 

Edinburgh, Scotland 
Teaching: 
Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, 

Scotland 
College of Art and Design, Stourbridge, 

England 
College of Art and Design, Birmingham, 

England 
University of Victoria, Faculty of Fine Arts, 

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada 
State University of New York: College of 

Ceramics, Alfred University 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, 

New York 
Pilkington Museum of Glass, Lancashire, 

England 
Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria, 

Canada 

Residence: 

Alfred Station, New York 

Curtis C. Hoard 

Born: 

St. Paul, Minnesota 1940 
Education: 

Wisconsin State University, River Falls, 
Wisconsin 



Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield 
Hills, Michigan 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Teaching: 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 
North Carolina 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota 

One-Man Exhibitions: 

Burpee Gallery, Rockford, Illinois 

Rochester Art Center, Rochester, Minnesota 

Collections: 

Minnesota Art Council, St. Paul- 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan 

Residence: 

St. Paul, Minnesota 



David Hopper 

Born: 

Dinuba, California 1946 

Education 

San Jose State College, San Jose, California 

One-Man Exhibitions: 

Frauenau Glass Museum, Frauenau, 

Germany 
William Sawyer Gallery, San Francisco, 

California 
Collections: 
OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 



Residence: 

Chico, California 



Kent F. Ipsen 



Born: 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1933 

Education: 

University of Wisconsin, 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Teaching: 
Mankato State College, 

Mankato, Minnesota 



59 



Prairie School, Racine, Wisconsin 
School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 

Chicago, Illinois 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Chicago Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois 
L'Atelier Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Wisconsin Art Center, Kenosha, Wisconsin 
Michigan Art Center, Kalamazoo, Michigan 
The Bergstrom Art Center, 

Neenah, Wisconsin 
Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Milwaukee Art Center, 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Georgegian College, 

Toronto, Ontario, Canada 
Mount Mary College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
University of Wisconsin Extension Center, 

Wausau, Wisconsin 

Residence: 

Northbrook, Illinois 



Art, Bowling Green, Ohio 
One-Man Exhibitions: 

Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, 

New York 
Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Columbus, 

Ohio 
Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, Arizona 
Craft Alliance Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri 
Collections: 
Pilkington Museum of Glass, Lancashire, 

England 
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio 
National Glass Museum, Leerdam, the 

Netherlands 
OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, Arizona 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Residence: 

Grand Rapids, Ohio 



Thomas Kekic 



John David Lander 



Born: 

Cleveland, Ohio 1943 
Education: 

Cleveland Art Institute, Cleveland, Ohio 
Wooster College, Wooster, Ohio 
Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 
Pratt Institute, New York, New York 
Teaching: 

Nazareth College of Rochester, 
Rochester, New York 

Residence: 

Canandaigua, New York 



Dominick Labino 



Born: 

Clarion County, Pennsylvania 1910 

Education: 

Carnegie Institute of Technology, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
School of Design, Toledo Museum of Art, 

Toledo, Ohio 
Teaching: 

Bowling Green State University School of 
60 



Born: 

Los Angeles, California 1946 

Education: 

California College of Arts and Crafts, 

Oakland, California 
San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, 

California 

Residence: 

Oakland, California 



John Conrad Lewis 



Born: 

Berkeley, California 1942 

Education: 

University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Richmond Art Center, Richmond, California 

Collections: 

Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, 

New York 
Sterling Associates, Palo Alto, California 



Residence: 

Oakland, California 



Marvin B. Lipofsky 



Born: 

Barrington, Illinois 1938 
Education: 

University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Teaching: 

Bazalel Academy of Art and Design, 

Jerusalem, Israel 
Gerriet Rietveld Academie, Amsterdam, 

Holland 
University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
California College of Arts and Crafts, 

Oakland, California 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Holland 
San Francisco Museum of Art, San 

Francisco, California 
Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New 

York, New York 
Lee Nordness Galleries, New York, 

New York 
University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 
Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland 
Museum Boymans-Van Beuningen, 

Rotterdam, Holland 
Oakland Art Museum, Oakland, California 
San Francisco Museum of Art, San 

Francisco, California 
Musee d'Art Contemporain, Skopje, 

Yugoslavia 

Residence: 

Berkeley, California 



Harvey Littleton 



Born: 

Corning, New York 1922 
Education: 

Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield 
Hills, Michigan 



University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 

Michigan 
Brighton School of Art, England 
Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant 

Teaching: 

Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

One-Man Exhibitions: 

Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New 

York, New York 
Lee Nordness Galleries, New York, 

New York, 1969, 1970 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin 
Chicago Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois 
Handwerkskammer, Munich and Cologne 

Collections: 

Museum of Modern Art, New York, 

New York 
Kunstgewerbe Museum, Cologne, Germany 
Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 

England 
Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, 

New York 
Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin 
OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland 
National Glass Museum, Leerdam, Holland 
Groningen Museum, Gronigen, Holland 
Museum of Glass, Liege, Belgium 
Republic of San Marino, Italy 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
Detroit Art Institute, Detroit, Michigan 
Addison Gallery of American Art, 

Andover, Massachusetts 
Universities of: Ohio State, Michigan, 

Illinois, Illinois State University, Arizona 

State, Western Illinois, Beloit College, 

Nebraska 

Residence: 

Verona, Wisconsin 



Born: 

Bumblebee, Arizona 1945 



Education: 

University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
Teaching: 
University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
University of Washington, Seattle, 

Washington 
San Francisco State College, San 

Francisco, California 
College of Marin, Kentfield, California 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Menolides Gallery, Seattle, Washington 
University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
Collections: 
OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co, 

Residence: 

Berkeley, California 



Richard Thomas McGlauchlin 

Born: 

Beloit, Wisconsin 1934 

Education: 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 

Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 

University of Washington, Seattle, 

Washington 
Teaching: 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Craft Alliance Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri 
Archy Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana 
Octagon House Gallery, Ames, Iowa 
Kalamazoo Art Center, Kalamazoo, 

Michigan 

Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co, 
Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 

New York, New York 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Residence: 

Toledo, Ohio 



61 



Joel Philip Myers 



Kimrie T. Newcomb 



Born: 

Paterson, New Jersey 1934 

Education: 

Parsons School of Design, New York, 

New York 
New School for Social Research, 

New York, New York 
Kunsfhaandvaerkerskolen, Copenhagen, 

Denmark 
Alfred University, Alfred, New York 

One-Man Exhibitions: 

Huntington Galleries, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
G. W. V. Smith Art Museum, Springfield, 

Massachusetts 
Lee Nordness Gallery, New York, New York 

Collections: 

Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 

New York, New York 
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
International Mineral and Chemical 

Corporation 
OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
West Virginia State Collection of Art 

Residence: 

Bloomington, Illinois 



Robert E. Naess 



Born: 

Morristown, New Jersey 1943 

Education: 

University of California, Berkeley, 

California 
Teaching: 
Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, 

Missouri 
Collections: 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 

Massachusetts 
St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, Missouri 
Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska 

Residence: 

Kansas City, Missouri 

62 



Born: 

Detroit, Michigan 1945 

Education: 

San Jose State College, San Jose, 

California 
Foothill College, Los Altos Hills, California 

Teaching: 

University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 
Foothill College, Los Altos Hills, California 

Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Huntington Galleries, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Honolulu Academy of Arts, Honolulu, 

Hawaii 
San Jose City College, San Jose, California 
Shasta College, Redding, California 

Residence: 

Champaign, Illinois 



Mark Peiser 

Born: 

Chicago, Illinois 1938 

Education: 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana 
Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of 

Technology, Chicago, Illinois 
De Paul University, School of Music, 

Chicago, Illinois 

Teaching: 

Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 
North Carolina 

One-Man Exhibitions: 

Hellen Winnemore Gallery, Columbus, Ohio 
American House, Michigan, Birmingham, 

Michigan 
Archy Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana 

Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
National Collection of Fine Arts, 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 
Chicago Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois 



Residence: 

Penland, North Carolina 



Eriks P. Rudans 



Born: 

Latvia 1933 
Education: 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Teaching: 

University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, Wisconsin 
St. Cloud State College, St. Cloud, 

Minnesota 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 

Residence: 

Monona, Wisconsin 



Jack A. Schmidt 



Born: 

Toledo, Ohio 1945 

Education: 

Bowling Green State University, Bowling 

Green, Ohio 
Penland School of Crafts, Penland, 

North Carolina 
Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 
Teaching: 

Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio 
Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Archy Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana 
Collections: 
Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan 

Residence: 

Bloomington, Illinois 



James L. Tanner 



Born: 

Jacksonville, Florida 1941 

Education: 

Florida A. and M. University, Tallahassee, 

Florida 
Aspen School of Contemporary Art, Aspen, 

Colorado 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 



Teaching: 

Mankato State College, Mankato, 

Minnesota 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Rochester Art Center, Rochester, Minnesota 
Hellen Winnemore Gallery, Columbus, Ohio 
Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
North Hennepin State Junior College, 

Osseo, Minnesota 
Mankato State College, Mankato, 

Minnesota 

Residence: 

Good Thunder, Minnesota 



James AA. Wayne 



Born: 

San Francisco, California 1939 

Education: 

San Jose State College, San Jose, California 

Teaching: 

San Jose City College, San Jose, California 

University of Southern California, Los 

Angeles, California 
Pasadena City College, Pasadena, 

California 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Ames Gallery, Berkeley, California 
Galeria del Sol, Santa Barbara, California 
Grossmont College, El Cajon, California 
Collections: 

OBJECTS: USA-The Johnson Wax Co. 
Wichita Art Association, Wichita, Kansas 
Fine Arts Society of San Diego, San Diego, 

California 
Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, Washington 
Oakland Art Museum, Oakland, California 
San Jose State College, San Jose, California 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 
Northern Illinois University, De Kalb, Illinois 

Residence: 

Soquel, California 



lichael Whitley 



Born: 

Everett, Washington 1938 



Education: 

Royal College of Art, London, England 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
University of Washington, Seattle, 

Washington 
Everett Community College, Everett, 

Washington 
Teaching: 
Central Washington State College, 

Ellensburg, Washington 
Highline Community College, Midway, 

Washington 
One-Man Exhibitions: 
Royal College of Art, London, England 
Cheny Cowels Museum, Spokane, 

Washington 
Collections: 
Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 

England 
Royal College of Art, London, England 
Howell Design, New York, New York 
Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington 

Residence: 

Ellensburg, Washington 



Jan Zandhuis 

Born: 

The Netherlands 1937 
Education: 

Deventer College, The Netherlands 
Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands 
Teaching: 

Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 

Residence: 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



63 



Officers 

Harold Boeschenstein 
President 

J. P. Levis 

Blake-More Godwin 
George P. MacNichol, Jr. 
Vice-Presidents 

Trustees 

John D. Anderson 
Lawrence G. Bell 
John D. Biggers 
Harold Boeschenstein 
Samuel G. Carson 
F. Earle Cazayoux 
James C. Donnell, II 
William C. Draper 

Honorary Trustees 

The Most Rev. Karl J. Alter 
Ward M. Canaday 
Curtis W. Davis 
John K. Davis 
James P. Falvey 
George M. Jones, Jr. 
Jerome F. Kapp 



Samuel G. Carson 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Leonard C. Urbanski 
Assistant Treasurer 



Blake-More Godwin 
Richard R. Johnston 
Edward F. Knight 
Marvin S. Kobacker 
J.P.Levis 
Sanley K. Levison 
George P. MacNichol, Jr. 
Rene C. McPherson 



Frank L. Kloeb 
Robert G. Landers 
Mrs. William E. Levis 
Jules D. Lippmann 
John E. Martin 
Harris Mcintosh 
Charles L. McKelvy, Jr. 



Otto Wittmann 
Director 

Charles F. Gunther 
Assistant Director 
(Education) 



Raymon H. Mulford 

General Lauris Norstad 

Roy Rike 

David R. Rittenhouse 

Willardl.Webb, III 

Robert G. Wingerter 

Otto Wittmann 

W. Paul Zimmerman 



Mrs. Peter R. Orser 
George W. Ritter 
John W. Snyder 
Duane Stranahan, Jr. 
Robert A. Stranahan, Jr. 
Ford R. Weber 



THE TOLEDO 
MUSEUM OF ART 

Monroe Street at Scottwood Avenue 
Toledo, Ohio 43620 



Officers 

Mrs. Vanderbilt Webb 
President and 
Chairman of the Board 

John L. Baringer 
Vice-Chairman 

Trustees 

Nicholas B. Angell 
John L. Baringer 
Cynthia Bringle 
Kenneth Chorley 
Jean Delius 
Mark Ellingson 
Arline Fisch 
R. Leigh Glover 

Honorary Trustees 

Alfred Auerbach 
64 



Donald L.Wyckoff 
Executive Vice-President 

R. Leigh Glover 
Treasurer 



Robert D. Graff 
August Heckscher 
Samuel C. Johnson 
Walter H.Kilham, Jr. 
Jack Lenor Larsen 
Sarah Tomerlin Lee 
Vera Neumann 
DeWittPeterkin, Jr. 



Edward Wormley 



Joseph P. Fallarino 
Assistant-Treasurer 

May E.Walter 
Secretary 



Donald Reitz 
Frances Senska 
Paul Soldner 
William Snaith 
Dr. Frank Stanton 
May E. Walter 
W. Osborn Webb 
Mrs. Vanderbilt Webb 



AMERICAN 
CRAFTS COUNCIL 

44 West 53rd Street 

New York, New York 10019 



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